The other day, the social media advised that the Summer Olympics in Tokyo, which was supposed to start on July 23, but was subsequently postponed to the next year due to the pandemic, might not take place at all. The reason why? According to the head of the Japanese organizing committee for the 2020 Games Yoshiro Mori, this can happen if the pandemic cannot be stopped within a year. The possibility of holding the Olympics with a minimum number of spectators, or even without them is also considered.

The background to the concern is banal: money. According to Yoshiro-san, the delay has already robbed the Tokyo Olympics budget of several billion dollars. Obviously, the absence of living spectators will completely pierce a fatal hole in it. It is no secret that the organizers of the Olympic Games receive the main income from the sale of services, tickets and paraphernalia to sports fans, so the sale of TV broadcasting rights alone is unlikely to make up for the lost income.

 

On 1 June, the world celebrates Children's Day. Children are the most precious thing that we have, for the sake of them we live. Therefore, I decided to talk about the future. Children are our future. What kind of future will it be, in what world will our children live? Do we need to worry about this today?

Recently, I stumbled upon a small article in one of the leading business magazines. It turns out that the demand for the construction of individual shelters - anti-nuclear bunkers and security rooms - sharply increased among wealthy Russians. These are completely autonomous premises where a family of four can stay for up to a year without experiencing any inconvenience (except, perhaps, psychological). Companies specializing in such non-standard facilities report that in the first three months of this year, demand for them has grown by 2000 percent!

I don’t know if it is possible to congratulate our readers on the end of boring self-isolation. It is just amazing how easy the new disease – which is still not the most aggressive and murderous known to man - has brought the world economy to its knees. Yes, but if only the economy!

The ease with which the pandemic knocked out mankind only speaks of how unreliable the former, prematurely dilapidated world, built on the principles of false liberalism and rampant consumption, turned out to be. It is not surprising that from the very beginning of the pandemic many began to prophesy world’s end and outline the contours of our near future.

 

For a month now, Russia has been living in self-isolation caused by the pandemic of a new coronavirus. Other countries declared total quarantine before us, and some have already crossed the traditional forty-day threshold (“quarantena” in Italian), but only few decided to take the first timid steps to return to normal life.

Obviously, the states’ leaders prefer not to rush, but the economic losses are huge. All have suffered. Of course, authorities, albeit to varying degrees, tried to support the weaker categories of citizens and sectors of the economy. However, it is simply impossible to protect everyone at the same time, and the trouble is that it’s not enough to get on the list of recipients of state aid, it must also arrive in time.

 

On the eve of a wonderful international holiday - the Day of Spring and Labour celebrated on 1 May - most recently passed the unnoticed anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. On 26 April 1986, the largest technological disaster in the Soviet Union occurred, the consequences of which are still felt. Almost 200 tons of radioactive substances were released into the atmosphere. The wind carried deadly particles around, and no one could do anything to prevent it.

We all, inhabitants of this planet, immediately felt how fragile the world around us is, how small it is, and how we are all defenceless against global cataclysms be it natural phenomena or technological disasters.

 And we realized that no ideology, no parades and bravura marches during the holidays will protect us from the negligence and incompetence of one single operator who, by moving his hand on the control panel of an atomic reactor, can put an end to the dreams and hopes of millions.

On the eve of a wonderful international holiday - the Day of Spring and Labour celebrated on 1 May - most recently passed the unnoticed anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. On 26 April 1986, the largest technological disaster in the Soviet Union occurred, the consequences of which are still felt. Almost 200 tons of radioactive substances were released into the atmosphere. The wind carried deadly particles around, and no one could do anything to prevent it.

We all, inhabitants of this planet, immediately felt how fragile the world around us is, how small it is, and how we are all defenceless against global cataclysms be it natural phenomena or technological disasters.

 And we realized that no ideology, no parades and bravura marches during the holidays will protect us from the negligence and incompetence of one single operator who, by moving his hand on the control panel of an atomic reactor, can put an end to the dreams and hopes of millions.

Tashi Delek (Hello!) to all the Sangha* friends:

I would like to take this opportunity to share some of my thoughts during this difficult time we are facing at the moment. The Government of India has imposed lockdown in all the states since March 22nd, 2020, so all the Dharmic places** including ours are closed. His Holiness is in retreat at his official residence in Dharamsala and is in very good health. Our monks are in retreat mode too and continuing our daily practices privately, while following the social distancing protocol advised by the Government.

 The Wuhan pandemic virus is creating a lot of problems throughout the world. During this time, we must pause and consider what is happening in relation to the virus pandemic. Perhaps, in the face of this plight, under these negative circumstances, we can still act in a way that accomplishes something positive.

A very talented singer, Lera Bazykina, launched Protect and Love flash mob. Its message is simple, like the colour of the sky above our head, like sunlight and a clear stream, like the splash of an oar that slightly touches the water of a calm pond on a calm day.

“Let's love our planet,” the girl said, “let's love and protect nature and all life on Earth, and most importantly, each other.” It’s easy! And it’s good that our children tell us adults about the main things in life.

 

No matter how difficult the situation may be, we should employ science and human ingenuity with determination and courage to overcome the problems that confront us, the 14th Dalai Lama said.

A special message from His Holiness states: "despite the enormous challenges we face, living beings, including humans, have shown a remarkable ability to survive."
“Faced with threats to our health and well-being, it is natural to feel anxiety and fear. Nevertheless, I take great solace in the following wise advice to examine the problems before us: If there is something to be done—do it, without any need to worry; if there’s nothing to be done, worrying about it further will not help, ”he said.

 

One of the biggest victims of the raging COVID-19 pandemic was the sport of excellence. The Champions League and European Football League cup competitions, NHL and KHL hockey tournaments, and the World Figure Skating Championships have been postponed to later dates. The fire of the 2020 Summer Olympics brought from Athens to Fukushima burns lonely at a local football centre in anticipation of better times when it will finally be solemnly delivered to Tokyo.
The World Chess Olympiad was postponed to a later date. I agree that to hold competitions of the sharpest minds of humankind in the old fashioned way, tête-à-tête, in large halls with a crowd of spectators, as we did before, is now unacceptable. But even if our game is one of the oldest in history, we still live in the third millennium!

 

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